24 Lessons I Learned When I Was Twenty Four

Today I turned 25. I thought I’d have a little more of a quarter-life crisis moment, but honestly I’m feeling pretty okay. Maybe that’s because I had my quarter-life crisis when I was 20 because I’m kind of a weirdo like that. Regardless, I am officially twenty-five. And for the first time, I actually feel sorta like a grownup. It’s weird, I never thought I’d get here. It’s like I’ve finally transitioned from “adulting” to just “adult.” At the same time, I also feel incredibly young, in the best way. Like this is the start to some of the best years of my life. Crazy stuff.

Generally when I think about this upcoming year, I’m really excited. I just feel like it’s going to be a big year full of firsts & surprises. In retrospect, I feel like 24 was a year of preparation, maybe for all these exciting things I’m anticipating. I learned a lot of things when I was 24. There were a lot of big events that occurred as well as long stretches of stagnancy. Both periods taught me different things–all valuable lessons that life thought I needed to learn. So, as I normally do on my birthday (you can check out 22, 23 & 24), here are some things I learned this past year. Twenty four, you were a doozy–thank you for the wild ride.

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25 & I still love hanging out in pumpkin patches.

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How to Make the Most of Your Weekends

A few months ago, I was talking to one of my friends who had just moved out of her parents’ house into her own apartment. She had spent the first year out of college living back home to save some money, so we were talking about the transition to living “on her own.” During the conversation, she asked me something that surprised me: “What do you do on your weekends?” 

The question kind of caught me off guard.  But when I thought about it more, I do remember when I first moved to my apartment & started my first full-time job, my weekends were kinda…weird. Sometimes I’d have a jam packed weekend of seeing friends & doing fun things, and others were just sort of lost because I was ridiculously lazy & barely moved from my couch. Both situations weren’t super great–I either started the work week super tired because I didn’t recharge during the weekend or I felt like I didn’t make the most of my weekend.

There are a lot of studies/articles out there about “making the most of your weekend” & most of them focus on having a balance of fun, social things & relaxing, productive things. So here are a few of my suggestions for making the most of your weekend. You only have 48 hours of freedom, spend them wisely.

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the best weekends include coffee & croissants // Malvern Buttery

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How to Honor Here

According to Google the dictionary,  a “transition” is defined as “the passage from one state, stage, subject, or place to another,” or “a movement, development, or evolution from one form, stage, or style to another.” There’s also a third definition of: “an abrupt change in energy state or level (as of an atomic nucleus or a molecule) usually accompanied by loss or gain of a single quantum of energy.” (#science)

Transitions. They happen to us frequently, unexpectedly & sometimes, annoyingly.

When I think about transitions, I think about a flurrying of events. Sometimes they’re big events but often time they’re smaller–a series of seemingly insignificant occurrences that rapidly accumulate to create this bigger transition. When I think of transitions, I think of things happening (kind of like that atomic nucleus definition). Nothing is standing still, everything is moving and dynamic.

But what I didn’t realize is that transitions can be prolonged, too. Sure, some transitions are quick & defined–going to college, starting a first job, getting married. But in normal everyday life, sometimes transitions stretch out for long periods of time–weeks, months, even years. There are slow shifts, imperceptible changes that you don’t realize are happening until the full transition is over. They leave you antsy & anxious, like you know something is happening but you can’t put your finger on what. A transition is not the starting point, nor is it the destination. It’s the inbetween part, limbo part, the changing part.

This is how I imagine our 20’s: a series of long transitions.

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honor here & be kind (to yourself)

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